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FREE | English Premier League Data Report, 2019

In the latest interactive monthly data report, SportBusiness Media analyses the global media-rights of the English Premier League.

Further detail on the deals covered in this interactive data report is available with our Rights Tracker tool – click here for more information.

For the full data report, click here.

Global growth

The Premier League has recently closed its 2019-20 to 2021-22 media-rights sales cycle. It delivered yet another increase in value, with total revenues up by about 8 per cent compared to the 2016-17 to 2018-19 cycle.

That said, the growth rate in rights revenue was significantly down on the 2016-19 cycle, which saw a rise of about 54 per cent on seasons 2013-14 to 2015-16.

The Premier League struggled to recreate its previous success due to the dip in value of its domestic rights. Domestic revenue dropped 7.8 per cent for the 2019-22 cycle. This was driven largely by a 9.6-per-cent fall in the value of live rights as the pay-TV war between Sky and BT froze.

It was the first decline in the value of the league’s domestic rights since the fractional decrease in the 2010-11 to 2012-13 cycle compared with the 2007-08 to 2009-10 cycle.

The league managed to increase the global revenue from its rights due to an impressive 35-per-cent growth in the value of its international rights. However, SportBusiness Media understands that about half this increase was linked to $- and €-denominated contracts rising in relative value with the falling pound due to the UK’s decision to leave the European Union in 2016.

Using the prevailing dollar/pound and euro/pound rates when every deal in the cycle was announced, SportBusiness Media finds the sterling value of the Premier League’s international rights amounts to £1.457bn per season for 2019-22 – a £378m rise on the £1.079bn per season banked for the 2016-19 cycle.

Regional importance

Of the top European football leagues, the Premier League garners the most value from its international rights sales due to its wide-spread popularity.

The most valuable region for the Premier League is Asia-Pacific, which brought in revenues of about $624.3m per season for the 2019-22 cycle, or 32.9 per cent of the total. Nine of the top 20 per-season international rights fees came from the region. The league’s most valuable deal was in China, with streaming company PPTV.

Europe is the league’s next-most valuable region. It brought in revenue of about $572.1m per season for 2019-22, or 30 per cent of the total. Of the deals in Europe, 48.4 per cent of the revenue came from three deals: in France, with pay-television broadcaster Canal Plus; in Norway, with commercial and pay-television broadcaster TV2; and in Sweden, with Nordic Entertainment (Nent) Group.

Europe was also the region that delivered four of the five largest percentage increases in the 2019-22 cycle. These came in Denmark (100 per cent), Portugal (100 per cent), Germany, Austria and Switzerland (69 per cent) and Spain (64 per cent).

Despite its position as the most valuable region to the Premier League, Asia-Pacific has produced four of the five biggest percentage drops anywhere in the world in the 2019-22 cycle. The new deal with PPTV in China, an increase of 1196.1 per cent, masked the problems that the league faced in the region.

The biggest percentage drop was the league’s 2019-22 agreement in the Caribbean with Caribbean Premier Sports Limited. The calue of the deal decreased in value by about 61.5 per cent from the 2016-19 cycle when the league sold rights to telco CWC.

Most recent

Uefa, European football’s governing body, could be on the verge of a sharp downturn in Champions League media-rights revenues for the 2021-24 cycle, with specific factors in the key UK and France markets exacerbating a broader price correction already anticipated for similar high-profile properties.

The deal struck this week between US media group Discovery and social media platform Twitter for coverage of the 2020 summer Olympic Games in Tokyo is expected to be the first of many such clip and highlights deals, as Discovery looks for additional ways to monetise its substantial investment in the rights in Europe.

Greek public-service broadcaster ERT has acquired rights for the International Basketball Federation (Fiba) Champions League in a one-season deal after pay-television broadcaster Nova elected not to renew, with the property’s value falling by 25 per cent on a per-season basis.

Wanda Sports’ mass participation drive and its subsidiary Infront’s push for summer sports were the basis for their decision to push into athletics through a record 10-year agreement with the International Association of Athletics Federation, from 2020.