(EPL) English Premier League

Features

England’s Premier League this week completed the first set of deals across Asia for its rights in the 2016-17 to 2018-19 cycle, with mixed results. It saw significant increases in value from Australia and New Zealand, but a decline in Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, while Malaysia and Myanmar are proving difficult.

Strong competition in the Nordics between established media groups and an as-yet unidentified player helped the Premier League double its income in the region – continuing the remarkable start to its new international sales cycle.

Chinese internet company LeTV Sports’s acquisition of English Premier League rights in Hong Kong is indicative of the company’s international ambitions.

USA

NBCUniversal blew its rivals out of the water to retain Premier League rights in the US earlier this month – the league’s first deal in its new international sales cycle.

The value of Premier League internet rights increased hugely in deals in China, but the value of digital clips in the UK remained flat in this week’s deal with Sky.

BeIN Sports and Abu Dhabi Media are bidding head-to-head for two major football properties in the Middle East and North Africa – England’s Premier League and Uefa’s European Qualifiers.

TV2 Norway’s deal to buy the C More pay-television operation in Norway last month was driven by a desire to boost subscriber numbers ahead of the upcoming Premier League auction.

It is not yet clear whether Sky’s 83-per-cent increase in spending on Premier League rights was down to a blockbuster first-round bid to see off BT, a second-round reaction to aggressive BT bidding, or a combination of both.

The UK pay-television market delivered another sensational boost to English Premier League revenues yesterday with new live domestic media rights deals worth £5.136bn ($7.8bn/€6.9bn) over the three seasons from 2016-17 to 2018-19.

On the day of the Premier League’s domestic rights bidding deadline, TV Sports Markets editor Frank Dunne looks at the league’s chances of enjoying a bumper pay day.

Ofcom will be fighting a lonely battle in trying to convince the Premier League to make all of its matches available for live broadcast in the UK.

The Premier League has a “moral obligation” to provide greater funding for grassroots football from the proceeds of its domestic media-rights sales, the UK’s Labour party said this week.

Interview with Clive Efford, the UK’s Shadow Minister for Sport, on Labour's intention to increase Premier League investment in grassroots football.

Sport not off the hook in Brussels rights probe, expert says

Premier League gets tough, even with Murdoch, to protect UK investments of Sky and BT