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ESL signs expanded agreement with Facebook

Esports organisation ESL has expanded its partnership with Facebook Gaming to deliver non-exclusive coverage of its global competitions on the social media platform.

ESL will broadcast its Intel Extreme Masters (IEM) and ESL One circuit events, along with the premier professional Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (CS:GO) Pro League.

Distribution began with the Regional Qualifiers in CS:GO for the IEM Katowice Minor on January 16. The deal runs until December, with competitions to be streamed worldwide in English through 1080p/60fps broadcasts, and ESL Pro League live streams to be provided in both English and Portuguese.

Coverage will be shown at fb.gg, Facebook’s gaming video destination, and on individual pages for IEM, ESL One and Pro League.

“Expanding ESL content to include all global esports competitions is a way for us to satisfy the growing appetite for watching gaming video content on Facebook,” Leo Olebe, global director of games partnerships at Facebook, said.

“Providing ESL fans a way to watch esports on multiple platforms is something we know the community cares about, and that’s a big reason why all 2019 content will broadcast anywhere ESL chooses to stream. We’ll continue to listen and act on feedback from gamers as we work together in building the world’s gaming community.”

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