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INF signs first agency partnership with Lagardère Sports

The International Netball Federation has engaged in its first media-rights partnership with an agency, agreeing a six-year deal with Lagardère Sports.

Lagardère Sports will commercialise and distribute international media rights from 2018 to 2023, beginning with the 2019 World Cup, which will take place in Liverpool from July 12-21.

The agreement also includes the 2023 World Cup – hosting rights to which are being contested by New Zealand and South Africa – as well as Fast5 tournaments, the Youth World Cup and World Cup qualifiers.

Nikolaus von Doetinchem, executive vice-president of media at Lagardère Sports, said: “With the increasing impact of women’s sports and particularly the success netball has seen over the last few years, it’s the perfect time to begin commercialising the INF’s media rights.

“Thanks to recent, high-profile netball performances, such as England’s dramatic win at the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games, interest in the sport has never been higher and we’re looking forward to providing fans with more of the action from the court.”

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