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WTCR’s Chinese partner gears up for home race

Chinese sports streaming platform QiE has expanded its commitment to the World Touring Car Cup (WTCR) motor-racing series.

The announcement comes ahead of this weekend’s WTCR Race of China-Ningbo, with QiE to show all three races live. The Tencent-owned platform will also offer viewers insight from drivers and team principals though interviews carried out by an onsite crew at the event.

The WTCR launched in December following a licensing agreement between the World Touring Car Championship and the TCR series. QiE struck an initial rights deal in April through an agreement with Qishi, the series’ rights-holder in China.

Mingjue Ye, business department general manager of QiE, said: “As the exclusive live broadcast partner of WTCR in China, we have cooperated and broadcasted five races, and the total viewing person-time is nearly two million. At each event, we excavate the highlights of the event and set up interesting interactive mechanisms such as sweepstakes to attract fans’ attention. We have also been trying hard to show the events in a more entertaining way.”

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