Football

Features

Nordic Entertainment (Nent) Group’s monster six-season English Premier League deal signed this month has shocked the Nordic media market and left TV2 in Norway reeling.

Portuguese commercial broadcaster TVI’s acquisition of free-to-air rights to this summer’s Euro 2020 competition was driven by its desire to regain its status as Portugal’s most-watched terrestrial channel, SportBusiness Media understands.

Uefa has increased the value of its lower-tier club competition media rights in Germany by over 40 per cent through commercial broadcaster RTL’s acquisition of exclusive, multi-platform rights to the Europa League and newly created Europa Conference League.

Uefa has continued its success in the DACH region by more than doubling the value of its club competition rights in Austria and significantly increasing them in Switzerland.

The Korea Football Association is finalising a deal with pay-television broadcaster JTBC for domestic K-League media rights for the 2020-23 cycle, but men’s senior national-team matches remain on the market after a lacklustre response to a tender held in January.

CJ ENM’s step back into sport after a near-decade-long hiatus was not enough to save DDMC Fortis from a fee decline in its sale of Asian Football Confederation rights in South Korea for the 2021-24 cycle.
USA

US sports broadcaster ESPN has reaffirmed its strategic commitment to football by paying a substantial sum for exclusive rights to the Spanish Copa del Rey knock-out competition.

DAZN’s determination to add domestic football to its portfolio of rights in Spain led the OTT platform to pay Mediaset a Copa del Rey sublicensing fee that covers entirely what the latter spent on the rights just three months ago.

Uefa’s Europa League revenue in France will fall in the 2021-24 cycle given limited interest in the property in the wake of the fierce contest for rights to the top-tier Champions League.

StarTimes, the Chinese-owned African pay-television broadcaster, was able to exploit regulatory pressure facing rival broadcaster SuperSport and secure exclusive rights to the English FA Cup and Community Shield at a reduced fee.

The English Premier League has launched the first international media-rights tender of its new sales cycle, going early in the Nordics and offering up the opportunity to bid for six seasons – the first time it has done so in Europe.

Belgian Pro League clubs will be able to exploit near-live clips on their own digital subscription platforms in the next rights cycle: the first time European clubs have been able to do so without long hold-back periods.

Korea’s K-League and the Korean Football Association have pooled their media rights, but an initial tender attracted no firm bids, forcing the rights-holders to extend the deadline and change the tender’s terms to allow consortia to participate.

Uefa has increased the value of Champions League rights in Germany by nearly 70 per cent in the 2021-24 cycle, driven by an intense broadcaster battle in which DAZN ousted Sky Deutschland and Amazon made another foray into premium football.

The Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) accepted a fee from telco Telefónica for Supercopa de España domestic rights that was just half its original target, driven by a dearth of competition for the property.

Sports marketing companies and private equity houses bidding to become the vehicle for the delivery of Fifa’s new China-hosted club competition in 2021 will face the same challenge: the competition is only likely to be successful if a Chinese company is involved.

The South African Broadcasting Corporation’s new deal with the South African Football Association was agreed at a more than 50-per-cent reduction on the pair’s previous rights agreement, with the broadcaster’s financial difficulties key to the decline.

The differing treatment of media operators in the latest Belgian Pro League domestic rights tender is justifiable as a way of increasing competition, according to the country’s competition authority.

Premier League club Liverpool’s decision to launch ‘paid-for’ content options on global video-sharing platform YouTube is a taster of how the platform will develop its sports-broadcasting partnerships.