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Premier League finds life tough in Pacific Islands and NZ, as competition dries up

BURNLEY, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 02: Chris Wood of Burnley misses a chance on goal during the Premier League match between Burnley FC and Southampton FC at Turf Moor on February 2, 2019 in Burnley, United Kingdom. (Photo by Robbie Jay Barratt - AMA/Getty Images)

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