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Action Images teams up with PGA Tour, PSA and Lagardère Sports

Action Images, the sports media agency owned by news agency Reuters, has agreed content partnerships with golf’s PGA Tour, the Professional Squash Association and the Lagardère Sports agency.

Terms of the deals were not disclosed, but all three entities will begin using Action Images services to distribute sports highlights on the Reuters Connect platform.

PGA Tour will make available tournament previews, round-by-round recaps, player interviews, and press conferences for media broadcasters. Coverage will be available for all Tour events.

The PSA will provide daily coverage across video, pictures, and text for the largest squash tournaments worldwide, including the sport’s longest running event, May’s British Open, and the World Tour Finals in June.

Lagardère Sports plans to make available a variety of football video highlights from the ASEAN Football Federation, as well as other content focused on sports in Asia.

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